Reading MPU9250 sensors with Arduino

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MPU-9250 is one of the most advanced combined accelerometer, gyroscope and compass small size sensors currently available. It replaces the popular MPU-9150 lowering the power consumption, improving gyro noise and compass full scale range performance. It has many advanced features, including low pass filtering, motion detection and even a programmable specialized processor.

How to use the NRF24L01 module with Arduino

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Having two or more Arduino boards be able to communicate with each other wirelessly over a distance opens lots of possibilities like remotely monitoring sensor data, controlling robots, home automation and the list goes on. A good, reliable and inexpensive solution is NRF24L01.

The NRF24L01+ is a newer version of the NRF24L01, capable of doing an extra 250kbps of on-air data rate while the one without “+” has only 1Mbps and 2Mbps. Both versions can be mixed together as long as 1 or 2 MBps is being used as the data rate.

Using push buttons with Arduino

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Today we are going to speak about push buttons, the wiring and how to implement the code for this circuit elements in Arduino. Push buttons connect two points in a circuit when you press them. That means that logic state of the circuit change when you press and keep pressed the button.

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How to use potentiometer with Arduino

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A potentiometer is a simple knob that provides a variable resistance, which we can read into the Arduino board as an analog value. They can be attuned from zero ohms to whatever maximum resistance that is specific to it. For example, a potentiometer of 10 kΩ can be adjusted from 0 Ω to its maximum of 10 kΩ.

Pull-up and Pull-down resistors

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A resistor is a passive two-terminal electrical component that implements electrical resistance as a circuit element. In electronic circuits, resistors are used to reduce current flow and adjust signal levels among other uses. Resistance is measured in Ohm with a sign of Ω.

A microcontroller (e.g. Arduino) utilizes I/O signals for communication with external hardware devices, where the most commonly known being GPIO. As a reminder, digital logic circuits have three logic states: high, low and floating (or high impedance). When there’s nothing connected to your GPIO pins, your program will read a floating impedance state, which we do not want. To achieve either high or low states, we’ll have to implement pull-up or pull-down resistors in our digital circuit.

How to use an analog module with Arduino

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The KY-023 is an easy-to-use analog joystick. The joystick uses a biaxial potentiometer to control the X and Y axis. It also has an integrated push button. In this tutorial, it is shown how to connect the KY-023 joystick with the Arduino and how to use it.

How to use tricolor LED module with Arduino

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The KY-016 is capable of producing wide range of different colors by mixing blue, green and red lights. The RGB LED module will not require any limiting resistors. Those resistors are already integrated in the circuit, and so 5V can be directly used as power input.

Using switch buttons with Arduino

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Let's speak now about switch buttons, the wiring and how to implement the code for this circuit elements in Arduino. Switch buttons connect two points in a circuit when you press them and maintain the state without the need to keep the button pressed. That means that logic state of the circuit change every time you press the button.

Regulated power supply module based on AMS1117

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We often use the power supplies like batteries or direct AC/DC supply which are normally in higher ranges compared to the actual requirement for the circuit. In that cases we need this kind of voltage regulators which can regulate and vary the voltage levels for the circuit requirement.

The AMS1117 series of chips are linear voltage regulators with low voltage drop. The modules based on the AMS1117 chip provide constant 3.3V or 5V outputs from an unregulated DC input. It's very compact and can be included in your project schema or you can use it together with a breadboard for circuit testing.

Using touch sensor with Arduino

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Touch sensor (also known as touch button) is widely used to control devices. It detects touch, force or pressure on its surface changing the logic state of the circuit. Actually, it works in very similar way as to buttons. Checkout the wiring and Arduino code implementation to track the current state and the state changes.